Optimizing Workforce Efficiency: Employee Utilization with Agilonomics

Effective “Utilization” of Employees

Have you heard the phrase? – “Watch the Baton, not the runners?” Translated to development work, it means:   “Focus on Idle work, not Idle workers”! (Image 1) I still come across management finding ways to extract most out of their developers by assigning them to multiple projects   The thinking is to get 100% utilization out of each worker So, Joe is made to work: 40% on project A, 30% on project B, and 30% on project C   And, this way Joe is 100% utilized! Such a mindset is flawed Here are two different ideas to explain this: Theory#1: Queueing theory and utilization (Image 2) As you can see, when queue sizes are small(optimum), utilization looms around 70% – 85%. Work continues to flow optimally. A little surge here and there is absorbed easily   With further increase in queue size, utilization shoots over to 100%.  Things slow down considerably and bottlenecks are seen   This means that if Joe is close to 100% utilized, then it will slow down the delivery or completion of all the items he is working on Furthermore, if Joe’s team mates Harry and Nancy are all (also) 100% utilized, then the team cannot handle critical items that suddenly pop up and need attention And, hence, Management needs to focus on idle work and not idle workers!   Theory#2: Context switching 40% + 30% + 30% does not add up to 100%   IT DOES NOT!   Why? Because, Joe is a human being and not a “resource” There is context switching and we know that loss of time due to context switching is pure waste! Image 3 – is from research on multi-tasking done by Clark and Wheelwright (1992) which shows that when working on more than two projects, a person’s time spent on value-adding work drops rapidly   Multitasking is an evil and really speaking, everyone is to be blamed and not only the management   I once met a developer who was asked to divide his time between 4 different projects, and as a result, couldn’t deliver to his Scrum team commitments but was fine working on the 4 projects as it brought him importance and visibility at the cost of impacting all the projects – spread across 3 Scrum Teams   It took several coaching sessions between us that helped him realize that this may negatively impact him in the long run as well and he voiced his new understanding to the management and they set him with just two projects which helped everyone!   With these two well researched theories, management and leaders need to reflect on how they utilize their people and best ways to help them be effective!   What has been your experience with over utilized workers and multi-tasking? How have you dealt with such a mindset and what have you done about it?   (taken from Amit’s Linkedin post “January 12, 2023”)

Scrum Managers: Agile Leadership Roles With Agilonomics

Managers in Scrum

We all know that the Scrum Team consists of the three main roles – Scrum Master, Product Owner and Developers (erstwhile Development Team)  Where do Managers fit in then?  Many think that Managers do not have a role in Agile and Scrum. Some even say that Managers are not necessary and teams can survive and even thrive without them Well, Agile being “agile”, is all inclusive and so Managers can live and actually help Agile grow and thrive in a number of ways Let us explore all different roles and places where Managers can fit in and how they can positively impact their Agile and Scrum teams and what do they need to avoid that would weaken agility in their environment and organization   Manager and Scrum Team: The Manager role has been in place long before Agile and Scrum came into being. Managers were responsible for taking care of people, what they work on, how they accomplish the work and would help with tracking the work     However, Agile encourages self organizing teams. Per the Agile manifesto:  The best architecture, requirements and design come from self organizing teams (Principle#11),  and  Build projects around motivated individuals. Provide them with the environment and support they need and trust them to get the job done (Principle#5) Furthermore, the Scrum roles and responsibilities outline the Scrum Master as one who owns the process, team effectiveness and team happiness. This includes conflict resolution, making sure the impediments are resolved in a timely manner, mentoring, guiding, coaching, facilitating, …  You may benefit from reviewing related blogs.  What Does A Scrum Master Do? | Agilonomics and An Ideal Career Path for a Scrum Master | Agilonomics for in-depth understanding of the Scrum Master role   Scrum Product Owner is the one who understands the market, the users and customers, brings in the requirements and prioritizes them. He/she creates the vision for the product and aligns it with the team and stakeholders. He/she works with the team to groom the backlog, is available to clarify requirements and accept the “done” work throughout the Sprint The Scrum Master coaches the developers and the Product Owner to work effectively keeping in mind the tenants of Agile, focused on value delivery and team effectiveness What is the role of a Manager in this setup then? And, where and how does a Manager fit in this whole picture?   Well, there are a number of ways Managers show up with Agile teams. I discuss a number of scenarios I have come across with examples and suggestions that can make the role effective Manager as the team boss: Developers report to the Manager and Scrum Master is an independent role with reporting lines in another department (example – PMO) Manager’s micro-managing the team can conflict with the Scrum Master role and create an impediment to Scrum effectiveness. If Scrum Master wants to experiment with the process or coach the team for following Agile Principles but the Manager opposes it, it will weaken the SM role and team effectiveness can suffer It is important that the Manager, Scrum Master and Scrum Master’s boss have a working agreement so that the Scrum Master feels empowered and the role is supported In the case the Scrum Master role is played by one of the developers then the Scrum effectiveness can be weakened further as there is no one for the Scrum Master to intervene if needed. Such Scrum teams work towards only perfecting “doing” Agile Manager as the Product Owner: This is common in many companies where Manager transitions to the PO role since she has been working with the same team managing the what, how and tracking prior to transitioning to Agile Scrum Master belonging to an outside-the-team department such as PMO may find it hard to coach the Manager in Agile ways. Example: Manager failing to agree-upon/cooperate on how to address change and repeatedly brings scope (creeping) in the middle of Sprints and justifying her being the PO, can call the shots on scope. Such reasoning can hamper with correct and effective agility Here, too, having a working agreement with the Manager and PMO can help empower the Scrum Master Again, If the Scrum Master happens to be a developer, then coaching one’s own Manager-cum-PO can be even harder and challenging Manager as the Scrum Master: This is a tough one. There is a conflict of interest in the two roles. A servant leader Scrum Master coaches the team, adheres to the Agile values and principles but experiments with the process to see what works best for his team. He is open to the team challenging his assumptions and disagreeing and in fact uses such disagreements to foster powerful conversations and bond the team However, when this role is played by the team Manager, it is difficult for developers to oppose or challenge the choices the Manager makes. The subtle thought, “my performance review will be impacted if I oppose my Manager”, is always in the back of the mind of the developers Best is to avoid this anti pattern in the roles because however hard you may try, you will find it will never achieve the right balance between the two conflicting roles   Manager as both the Scrum Master and the Product Owner: This is a double tough one. One for the reasons mentioned above and second for the two conflicting roles being played by the same person  Scrum Master role is to protect the team from being overly and unreasonably pushed by the PO and stakeholders while the PO role is to push and drive the team to achieve business goals. A delicate tension between the two roles is healthy for effective Scrum Remember, when the same person plays both the Scrum Master and Product Owner roles, it is like being a 2 headed dragon. At any time, one head will end up eating the other. In other words, you cannot be a good Scrum Master and a good Product

Jobs To Be Done vs User Story Maps – 2

scrum This is part 2 of the article on JTBD vs. USM For part 1 of the article, please refer to …… Jobs To Be Done vs User Story Maps In this article, we will fully dive deep into what Jobs To Be Done (JTBD)  really is and how it differs from User Story Maps. I will also help show how to use them collaboratively in meeting your needs. JTBD first came out when Clayton Chirstiansen, a professor at Harvard Business School’s Product Management group, set out with his team to understand what ‘needs’ drive people to ‘hire’ a product. Needs are driven by “jobs that need to be done”. In short, Clayton and his team ended up interviewing a number of people buying Milkshakes at a fast food restaurant. They asked each Milkshake buyer, “What jobs do they need done that makes them hire a milkshake?”  While many did not understand what the question really meant, Clayton’s team through observation and talking with customers figured out that people who had to commute long distances early AM needed to buy milkshakes to keep them full till lunch, to have something that takes quite a while to consume, to have something that is easily manageable while driving through the commute……. And that, they were not necessarily buying milkshakes because they were delicious. Here is the video where Clayton talks about Milkshakes! This and other experiments made Clayton and his team conclude that people hire a product because they have a certain job that needs to be done.  This is quite revolutionary.  “The secret to right innovation lies in understanding what causes customers to make choices that help them achieve progress on something they are struggling with in their lives. To get to the right answers, Christensen says, executives should be asking: “What job would consumers want to hire a product to do?” So, in summary, JTBD: Indicates what users want to get done Is independent of specific personas Provides insights into the deeper needs of the Customers. The deeper needs provide insights to a business on how to be innovative while creating products. A lot of people who love Apple phones still end up buying Samsung because their need is to have a better camera on their smartphones! User Story Maps (USM) on the other hand, is based on users and their experiences while using a product. USM focuses on specific personas and their story on how they (want to) use your product. A good user story map contains not only the journey but also the experience – challenges, pains, awards and joys the users feel or express while using your product. Although, the USM has no specific set of rules, it is recommended to understand the difference between the sea-level “user steps” (a step that a user takes in the journey of using your product with the intention of completing it once started) and the “backbone” – activity or higher level summary of a group of steps as shown in the image below Fig. xxx – User Story Map for an Air Travel App While both the sea level (user steps) and backbone (higher level summary) are in narrative flow, the backbone actually represents the jobs to be done and provides insights into the deeper needs of customers or users.  The narrative flow of sea level user tasks goes like this: (As a user of this product)  I will do this , and then I will do this, and then I will do this and then…. The narrative flow of backbone (user activity) goes like this: (As a user that wants to get this job done – air travel in this case)  I need to do this , and then I need to do this , and then I need to do this and then … Please refer to the examples below illustrating the above: Looking at these images, one can easily see that jobs to be done are already embedded into the user story maps. Many do not know how to create story maps effectively. If you can build your maps wisely and mark out areas or steps where customers and users experience challenges, pains and have to work around to get through those step(s), you will be able to draw insights on what they want to get done and what needs are not being met for which they have workarounds. Clayton himself has said: “For me, this is a neat idea,” Christensen writes of the Theory of Jobs to Be Done. “When we buy a product, we essentially ‘hire’ something to get a job done. If it does the job well, when we are confronted with the same job, we hire that same product again. And if the product does a crummy job, we ‘fire’ it and look around for something else we might hire to solve the problem.” Many folks who have never experienced story maps and their effectiveness and usefulness in creating delightful products, but know about Jobs To Be Done, use this thinking framework to draw insights. However, they will still need to create some sort of visual alignment for conversations to build a shared understanding.  ou cannot just use JTBD on its own to help others understand a product. Remember, JTBD is a motivation and not a product design! However, people who employ user story maps can easily draw out the jobs to be done Comparison between Jobs to be done vs. User Story Maps  Conclusion:  There’s quite a bit of debate out there on what is a better approach for building a great product, Jobs To Be Done Or User Story Maps. The reason for the debate is due to a lack of proper understanding of how these two approaches work. Looking deeply and objectively, one will find that they are not conflicting but are different ways to understand your customers and user’s real problems and goals, which is part of a good product thinking exercise. A user story map will ideally

Jobs To Be Done vs User Story Maps – 1

This part – 1 of the article explains situations that arise due to lack of ownership for journey mapping exercises. Who should own them?, why should they be done? Etc. The part – 2 of the article discusses in depth the Jobs To Be Done vs. User Story Maps – 2 Part-1 While helping clients with Agile transformation, I focus on a few important aspects, which are outlined below: Engaging executives, senior management and leaders from the beginning Roles and Responsibilities, Events and Ceremonies, The Team, PO and Scrum Master roles Helping create happy, high performing, effective  teams Product mindset and Value delivery – keeping the big picture context and desired outcomes in perspective from beginning to end It is with respect to this last point #4, I often introduce journey (aka user story) mapping concepts and workshops to the leadership. It is usually received with mixed response, and although, people love the workshop, they need some hand holding to get started onto this. We eventually get the product owners to own this and work with a small group of engineering and design leads to get the high level maps in place, which eventually results into exploring deeper area maps (remember: maps, contain maps, contain maps…) that are owned by individual teams as they try to build a shared understanding for the features or products they are responsible for. I also saw resistance from Product Owners to drive the creation of journey maps citing that they already created a PRD (Product Requirement Document) and since it’s all clear in their minds, they failed to understand why it is difficult for engineering and design teams to align with their thinking. The engineering team, on the other hand, complained that the product only provides a document or a one-liner explanation for critical items, and they have to interpret the details on their own. The design teams tended to side with engineering in not having a clear understanding of assumptions made by the product team. Moreover, the design team decided to start driving the creation of the JTBD list involving members from engineering and product through discussions. Let’s distil the issues hidden in the above paragraph:  Firstly, written documents do not create a shared understanding. Writing such documents and making them the basis for alignment is the reason why so many of the products fail to delight the end users and customers, and as such, do not do well in the market. I wrote an article on this: The Problem with Requirement Specification Documents Secondly, Product Owners not wanting to own creating visual artifacts (JTBD, Journey Mapping, etc.) and being more in the role of a secondary observer/participant is quite puzzling. On inquiring a little, I found that the Product teams had bandwidth issues, were overwhelmed in learning a new concept and lacked belief in new ways of thinking to create a powerful version of their product that would highly differentiate them from their competitor’s offerings. This not only needs coaching to understand the value of such activities, but also a commitment from the product leadership to invest time in them. Thirdly, the product leadership failed to understand why their Product Owners should co-drive the journey maps? I asked a few questions:  They realized that missing POs during such journey mapping activity might not give them the desired outcome they want to see while delivering the product! Once this was resolved, the product leadership had two asks: We really do not understand how to create user story or journey maps; can you help us get started with a hands-on exercise?  And, We have the same big question again: How is the JTBD (Jobs To Be Done) list different from journey mapping and if they are different, how can we leverage them in journey map creation? In answer to the first question, I took them through a fun and hands on user story map session. It took around 90 minutes to facilitate this for a big group of 20 people. I have captured this into a 4-minute cartoon video that anyone can find handy. In answer to the second question: Please read the part 2 of this article Jobs To Be Done vs User Story Maps Amitabh (Amit) Sinha is a servant leader entrepreneur, visionary, mentor, trainer and coach. Amit is highly passionate about Agile, its principles, values, and the human side. Amit is a people champion and strives to bring out the best in his teams. Amit leverages his expertise in Agile, Scrum, Kanban and people skills to increase team effectiveness and happiness. See more

Why sprint reviews are hard?

Why Sprint Reviews Are So Hard ?

Why Effective Sprint Reviews Are So Hard To Achieve? As we know, there are four main Scrum ceremonies: Sprint Planning, Daily Stand up, Sprint Review and Sprint Retrospective. Additionally, we also groom or refine the backlog (Backlog Refinement) which happens throughout the Sprint. The Sprint Review is second to last ceremony in the Sprint. The purpose of the Sprint Review is for an Agile team to show their product increment to the Product Owner and business stakeholders. The idea is, for the team to demo their product increment, features or functionalities and engage the audience in conversation to understand how they feel about it, what they like or dislike about it, what they think is still lacking etc. In the course of this conversation, the team gets valuable feedback, which they use to improve the product in subsequent iterations. Among all the Scrum ceremonies, the one that appears to be the weakest or least effective is the Sprint Review. There are many reasons why Agile teams struggle organizing effective Sprint Reviews. 1. The most critical reason is the inability of Agile teams to create their product keeping the big picture in mind. If one looks at the Product Backlog Items (PBI) of most Agile teams, they will not be surprised  to see that many of those items, called “Stories”, do not give any value to the end user or customer. Even combining a few of these stories does not give much value. Having finished these components, the team demonstrates those bits and pieces to the business stakeholders. Not only is this boring for the audience, they also do not  see much value in it. Imagine somebody is designing and creating a beautiful table, but only shows one leg and half of the top to potential buyers at an agreed upon date. Would you be excited to buy such a product? Will you even be motivated to come back and look at it unless it’s completely done?  I have often seen senior leaders and executives coming to a Sprint review for the first time when a new Agile team demonstrates their completed work. While these leaders praise the team for their accomplishments, you can see a confused look on their faces asking an unspoken question: The senior leaders and executives eventually stop coming to the Sprint Reviews, as they don’t find them meaningful. 2.  The second most important reason for Sprint Reviews to be not attended by senior leaders or relevant stakeholders has to do with the language used during the demo. What I mean here is, that a lot of Agile teams do the demonstration of their product in technical language. They bring up a screen with a Linux prompt and open the code, showing pieces to confirm on how the goal of a Story is achieved. While this could be attractive to other technical team members or even engineering managers, the business folks really do not get much value from it. This is akin to an audience that understands only Japanese, but being invited to a review of a product that is to be given fully in English. Just imagine bringing up a screen with English letters and words being displayed, with the hosting team speaking only in English. Will the Japanese stakeholders come back to such a Sprint Review? – NO! It would be a good idea for the (Business) Product Owner to actually drive the demo. They can work with the team and also speak the language of business stakeholders. Enabling stakeholders to be able to directly interact with the functionality of a product rather than demoing technical code will also be appealing to them. 3. Sprint Reviews being held on the wrong day of the week. Ideally, the Sprint cadence should run from Wednesday to Tuesday or Thursday to Wednesday. The advantage with this cadence is that the starting and ending days do not fall on a Monday or a Friday – the days when people tend to be busy or not easily available. For example, a 2-week Sprint that starts on a Wednesday will end 2 weeks later on a Tuesday. However, many teams, especially new ones, without much experience, tend to start their Sprints on a Monday or a Tuesday. This results in Sprint Review falling on Fridays or Mondays (Ideally the last day of a Sprint)  when senior leaders and relevant stakeholders are busy and unavailable, resulting in poor attendance.  4.  I have also seen that there are certain scaling frameworks in Agile which tend to encourage many teams in organizing their reviews or demos together. I have seen such teams sitting in a big conference room for hours together doing their Sprint Reviews. This is a painful sight to see. Especially so, because most of these teams were component teams and did not have much understanding of how each other’s work contributed to the bigger product. It is difficult to visualize senior leaders and business stakeholders sitting in such reviews for half a day. It would be considered a big waste of their time, and for this reason, attendance for such Sprint Reviews are low. 5. Lack of proper engagement of key stakeholders also results in poor attendance. Most teams call their Sprint Reviews as Sprint Demos. In fact, Sprint Demo has become the more popular name for Sprint Reviews. The whole idea of this ceremony is about engaging your customers and users for a meaningful conversation and taking important feedback that can be critical for the product success. But more often than not, hardly any conversation takes place. How do we break this barrier? One thing that comes to mind is, that, instead of waiting for the entire Sprint Review to be over, teams should take feedback after every item is reviewed. This will not only keep the stakeholders engaged, but will encourage them to provide valuable feedback for each item at the current time.  How often should we do Sprint Reviews? Ideally speaking, Sprint Reviews should be held every

A RAMBLE ABOUT METRICS – ZACH BONAKER

MEASURING AGILE How will you show the progress of agile transformation? How will you measure improvement in teams and people? And how will you avoid the trap of shallow metrics like say:do ratios and velocity? Whether you’ve worked as a manager, coach, or consultant, you’ve likely experienced conflict and confusion over “agile metrics.” Traditional metrics which emphasize personal productivity drive negative behaviors, encouraging us to stay busy with tasks over working together to achieve goals. Meanwhile, leaders feel dissatisfied with popular “agile metrics,” such as velocity and burn-down charts, when they fail to provide the insights desired. This conflict between management and the information generated by metrics is further exacerbated when three common human desires for “measuring agile” inevitably occur: The need to prove “the new way of working” achieves more than “the old way of working.” This desire typically reveals itself through challenges like, “how will we know we’re more productive with agile?” or “how can you show me are teams are more efficient?” The desire for agile to deliver “more quality.” Often, we hold on to the premise that a new process (e.g., teams will work in sprints) is the key to unlocking quality. The scenario can be especially challenging in the absence of systemic knowledge about quality. “Our CEO is sending strong messages expecting quality to improve. Beyond defect counts and customers complaining, we’ve never had a good idea of what quality is. What do we do?” Sound familiar? The belief that process conformance is a good proxy for success. How we will respond when a senior leader challenges us with, “I want to know the maturity of teams and the adoption of process. How can you show me our agile transformation is successful?” Success Metrics and Improvement metrics While there are many reasons these scenarios may be challenging–and frustrating–to solve, one possible contributor is the failure to distinguish between “success” and “improvement.” By definition, “success metrics” are exactly that: the key measurement which reflects on the interaction (and collaboration) within the system to generate a successful outcome. By taking a measure-up approach to avoid focusing on individuals, we can see whether our system of work is delivering the result we need. Because we’re considering the success of the system, we likely only need one, possibly two, success metrics. Further, such metrics would be relatively long-term in persistence. On the other hand, “improvement metrics” are useful until they no longer are. They exist to help guide us towards reaching a desired state, whether it be behavior, process, or performance. By definition, “improvement metrics” should be relatively short-term in lifespan and may change based on new information gathered. It’s easy to test for an improvement metric: we can state what decision(s) we will make as a result of the metric, plus what conditions would exist for the metric to no longer be useful. An interesting thought which comes to mind: perhaps in the early stages of using agile (and assuming an absence of prior “success metrics”), our success metric might be the length of time before an improvement metric becomes obsolete. I believe this structure of categorizing “success” and “improvement” metrics creates an environment where two beneficial things can happen: We reduce the fear (i.e., gaming) of metrics through transparency of our intent to use metrics. Clear statements of intent, as well as conditions to make metrics “go away,” often create motivation to work with–rather than against–measurement. The defined difference between “success” and “improvement” metrics can catalyze a helpful mindset change in people. To illustrate the second point, consider a scenario which might be familiar: A company shifts from a matrix system of work to teams working in sprints. Once this happens, a manager feels the need to measure team productivity and/or performance. After all, this is a new “process” and the manager wants to make sure it’s effective. To do so, the manager asks teams for a “say:do” ratio: the number of items/points/features/etc predicted versus the total actually delivered. If not success metrics, it is an improvement metrics It’s likely the manager considers this measurement a “success metric.” Therefore, we ask her to explain how the metric represents the interaction of all the parts necessary for success. Assuming our goal is wildly successful software products which our customers love, we likely realize this metric ignores essential contributions of product management, customer support, the degree of disruption the team must manage, and other probable factors. So, if not a success metric, might it be an improvement metric? We explore further: What decisions will we make with this metric? If a “say:do” ratio is considered poor (the team doesn’t meet their forecast), what happens? If the ratio is very good, what then? Could decisions we make with this metric encourage people to “game” the metric or be less transparent? What conditions must exist to make this measurement no longer needed? If a team meets their forecast 100% of the time, we likely no longer need it. Is this condition an indicator we have achieved our goals? I suspect these conversations might guide the manager to reveal her assumptions about measuring teams aren’t serving her ultimate needs. We then have the opportunity to explore together a more systemic need for measurement, most likely focusing on gathering information to improve, rather than perform. In my experience with agile and “transformation”, whatever that might be sometimes,  I’ve found results tend to improve when we move away from “metrics to manage behavior” and begin using “metrics to help us understand behavior.” This framework of success and improvement metrics can help us achieve exactly that outcome. About the Author Zach Bonaker Agile Coach Zach Bonaker is a “benevolent trouble-maker” based in San Diego, California, USA and has more than 10 years of experience assisting organizations with achieving their goals through improved working conditions and team-centric systems of work. With experience guiding Fortune 500 companies to multi-million dollar startups, Zach draws upon agile principles, relationships, and systems thinking to redesign structures into safe, collaborative

Agile SOW

Software projects are becoming increasingly complex. This complexity demands Agility. Agility translates to faster product increments, shorter review cycles, end-to-end picture of the product which essentially means incremental and iterative delivery. Quality needs to be built in. End user and customer engagement (via the PO) is indispensable for both building the “right product” and the “product right”. While the IT operations are going through a paradigm shift towards Agile, has the documentations such as SOW  changed to cater the needs of Agile world? What is an SOW ? Statement of Work (SOW)  is a legal binding contract between  an Organization and a contingent worker or a vendor that dictates the directions of how the work will be done. So, for Agile projects, the less you write, the better off you are. Remember, the mantra is: “Less is more”. Having said that, an SOW for an incrementally-delivered project should consider the following facts when drafting one. What system are you trying to build? What are the common objectives? Describe the system. Include lists of themes, (feature) areas and any other important descriptions that help both the parties to understand the system better. Declare – loud and clear – that our development strategy is incremental and iterative. In Agile, neither of the parties know up front 100% of features that will constitute the final system. We negotiate that with the product Owner (PO) on an ongoing basis Establish the  fact that features will be delivered incrementally in an iterative fashion called sprints. Define the sprint. A Sprint may range anywhere from 1 to 4 weeks of iterative cycle. The PO, business stakeholders and customer can review what has been created and provide valuable feedback at the end of each sprint to refine and re-prioritize for upcoming iterations. The project sponsor has the power to cancel the project should he/she see no further value in building this product. There should be a working agreement on how much advance notice the sponsor needs to provide to the development teams and it should ideally apply at the end of an ongoing sprint The customer/PO can choose to change the pace of delivery by changing priorities of upcoming features based on the review of product increment. The customer/PO cannot change the pace of delivery by demanding to cut corners (quality). In other words cutting out features/MMF is fine but delivering everything at a tighter pace by cutting upon quality is not acceptable Elaborate on what to Expect from the team. Include an initial delivery plan of features that the customer can expect from the team in the first 2 to 3 sprints in the order of priority. If possible, It is good to provide the vision, product backlog (top 3-4 sprints prioritized with 70-80% accuracy. Including a Release plan in SOW The SOW can include a statement that as the teams start working, they will put together a release plan to provide an insight on how the timelines look at this time. A note in bold must indicate that this is how it looks at the very beginning and that this release plan will be updated after every sprint and the updates will be made available to all stakeholders. The release plan should try to cover the below facts: Top 3-4 sprints with updated items(from the initial plan) Next 8-10 sprints prioritized with 50%-60% accuracy. Then, next 6-8 sprints could be with even lower( 30-40%) accuracy and the remaining items prioritized with 20% or lower accuracy. The PBI (product backlog items) should map to the product roadmap. The product roadmap should also have releases marked with farther out releases having increasingly lower accuracy (confidence rating) Initially the big blocks of work lower in the backlog will be Tshirt sized and the teams may want to have a rough mapping of Tshirt sizes to get an arbitrary value of story point . Alternatively, affinity sizing can be used to quickly and roughly estimate a large initial backlog so the teams have some numbers to refer to as they take strides into sprints With time, as the product emerges and evolves, the PO and stakeholders get better sense of the timelines with updated release plan which has estimates with higher accuracy The team velocity is an important factor for creating the release plan. Prediction of team velocity is possible after first few sprints. A team’s velocity is not same as any other team’s due to various factors like experience, number of members in team, complexity of product, the technology they are working on, their style of estimation, etc. Velocity plays an important role in Agile release planning. Proper coaching by a servant leader Scrum Master is highly essential for a Scrum team to estimate consistently, plan and commit to correct capacity and then deliver to its commitment. This brings up a stable velocity and predictability which in turn provides confidence to the PO and stakeholders and they look forward to the updated release plan Agile at the end of every sprint. Servant leader Project managers and Scrum Masters must include only the details in SOW that are of Agile nature. There should be no pressure from the leadership to include details that SMs/PMs do not feel confident about. This way the Servant leader SMs won’t be held hostage by not accomplishing timelines and scope they did not think could realistically be included in an Agile SOW. The behavior of the leadership in such companies that want to really adopt a more Agile way of working should be transparent and oriented towards creating a culture where their actions are in sync with their desire to be Agile  Final Notes    Let your SOW be versioned and wait for the signatures till an agreed upon Agile SOW is in place.  The first version of the SOW should be light. A small handful of sentences should suffice. If you do get push back, review your options, some of which could be:  If it’s not win-win, educate and coach the client on why Agile

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Jeff Cheeney

Trainer and Coach, Soaring Connections

 

Jeff Cheney is a dedicated trainer and coach at Soaring Connections, focusing on multiple aspects of Business Agility. His training and coaching are grounded in computer science degrees from Baylor University and the University of Southern California, three decades of experience in the efficient and effective delivery of software and hardware products, and a passion for the human element of business. Jeff has led agile transformations at NetApp, Western Union, and Cisco Systems, and has trained hundreds of students worldwide.

Jeff holds numerous SAFe certifications, including SAFe Practice Consultant, SAFe Release Train Engineer, SAFe Product Owner/Product Manager, and certifications in SAFe DevOps and SAFe Lean Portfolio Management. Additionally, he is trained in Lean Startup, Kanban, and holds a Green Belt in Lean. These qualifications enable him to bring a breadth of experience to his training, sharing insights on both successful and misapplied techniques.

His teaching style is hands-on and interactive, emphasizing active engagement and participation. Jeff encourages students to connect course content with their real-world experiences, fostering a deeper understanding. By sharing stories of his professional journey and experiences, he ensures students gain practical knowledge they can apply in real-world situations and on certification exams. Jeff’s approach prioritizes not just certification but the wisdom that comes from practicing the techniques and theories discussed in class, preparing students to excel in their roles.

Zach Bonaker

Benevolent Trouble-maker

Zach Bonaker is a “benevolent trouble-maker” based in San Diego, California, USA and has more than 10 years of experience assisting organizations with achieving their goals through improved working conditions and team-centric systems of work. With experience guiding Fortune 500 companies to multi-million dollar startups, Zach draws upon agile principles, relationships, and systems thinking to redesign structures into safe, collaborative environments. Zach is an international conference speaker, frequent podcast guest, and contributor to the global agile community. When he isn’t thinking about next-generation agile ideas, Zach can be found enjoying the sunny California weather and connecting with people all over the world.

team

Time: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm PST
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm PST

Duration: 1 day workshop
Cost: $475/person

TEAM WORKSHOP

On request this could also be split over 2 days

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Who makes an Agile Team?
    1. Scrum Team vs. Developers
    2. Working group vs. “Team”
    3. Understanding team development stages
  2. A day in the life of the developers (“The Team”)
  3. A Sprint in the life of the developers (“The Team”)
  4. Development Team Role and Responsibilities
    1. Developers working with the Scrum Master
    2. Developers working with the Product Owners
    3. Developers working with the Stakeholders
    4. Development team interactions and behaviors
  5. Agile basics – review
    1. Agile Values and Principles
  6. Scrum framework overview – review
    1. Scrum Values
    2. Scrum ceremonies – review
      1. Developers participation in Scrum events
  7. Understanding technical practices 
    1. TDD
    2. Pair Programming
    3. Whole Product Focus
    4. CI/CD
  8. Open topics
    1. Challenges faced in day to day work
      1. Brainstorm solutions 
  9. What makes a great Development Team member? 
  10. How to grow as a Developer?
    1. Cross functionality
  11. Next steps
agile-refresher

Time: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm PST
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm PST

Duration: 1 day workshop
Cost: $495/person

AGILE REFRESHER

On request this could also be split over 2 days

Learning Outcomes:

    1. Agile 
      1. Agile Origins
      2. Agile Mindset
      3. Agile Methodologies
      4. Agile Core Concepts
      5. Agile Manifesto
      6. When is Agile Effective?
      7. Iterative and Incremental
    1. Scrum 
      1. Scrum Values
      2. Scrum Overview
      3. Empiricism in Scrum – the 3 pillars 
      4. Scrum Framework
      5. Scrum Team
      6. Roles and Responsibilities
      7. Scrum Events
    1. Scrum Artifacts
      1. Product Backlog
      2. User stories – writing good stories
      3. Sprint Backlog
      4. Product Increment
  1. Open Topics
    1. What makes Agile and Scrum effective?
    2. Anti Patterns to look out for?
    3. Scrum vs. Kanban
  

AM/PM
Time: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm PST OR 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm PSTDuration: 3 hour workshop
Cost: $295/person

PROJECT RETROSPECTIVES

Learning Outcomes:

This is a facilitated session where participants are guided to participate in exploring what is going well, what can be further improved and ownership. The session includes a creative visual exercise which includes:

  1. Understanding why retrospectives are important?
  2. Interaction, engagement and ice breakers
  3. Identify what is going well
  4. Identify top impediments
  5. Improvement items and ownership

Time: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm PST
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm PST

Duration: 1 day workshop
Cost: $495/person

KANBAN

On request this could also be split over 2 days

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Introduction
  2. The Lean Principles
    1. Kanban and JIT Manufacturing
    2. Set Capacities in Kanban
    3. Batches Sizes in Kanban
    4. Software
    5. Main Properties of Kanban
  3. Start Enterprise Lean
    1. Value Stream Map
    2. Create a Value Stream Map
    3. Kanban and Pull System
    4. Demand on The Team
    5. Determining Capacity
  4. Putting up a Kanban Board
    1. Visualize the Product Flow
    2. How to Manage Queue Sizes
    3. Limit Work In Progress (WIP)
    4. Cumulative Flow Diagram for Measuring
  5. Set up the Board
    1. Three Classes of Service
    2. Feature Cards
    3. High Level Estimates
  6. Work off the Board
    1. Pitfalls of Kanban
  7. Closing
user-story-map-workshop

Time: 9:00 am – 11:00 am PST
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm PST

Duration: 1 day workshop
Cost: $395/person

USER STORY MAP WORKSHOP

On request this could also be split over 2 days

Learning Outcomes:

This is a comprehensive User Story Map training to immediately get you started with creating your own maps for all your projects. The training includes

    1. A 60 minute part-I (step 1) workshop to understand why it is important to write requirements using story maps approach
      1. Includes real life example 
    2. A 60 minute part-2 (step 2) hands on, step-by-step exercise to help participants understand how to create maps 
      1. Every step is followed by a learning outcome
    3. Open Q&A and the next steps
customize-training

Time: Varies per the request

Duration: 1-2 day workshop
Cost: $495/person
(Up to 8 hours)

CUSTOMIZED TRAINING

On request this could also be split over 2 days

Learning Outcomes:

You name the training and create learning objectives and we will come and deliver it and help meet your outcomes

SERVANT LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP

$1075/person

Time: 09:00 am – 12:00 pm PST
01:00 pm – 05:00 pm PST

Duration: 2 day workshop

Learning Outcomes:

SERVANT LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP

Mask group

Time: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm PST 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm PST 

Duration: 2-day workshop
Cost: $1075/person

Learning Outcomes

    • Introduction to Servant Leadership
      • What is Servant Leadership?
      • Impact of Servant Leadership
      • Servant Leadership Challenges
    • Traits of successful Servant Leaders
      • Responsibility
      • Passion
      • Selflessness 
    • Journey towards Servant Leadership
      • Understanding Life
      • Understanding Humanity
      • Understanding Leadership

 

    • Introduction to science based mental fitness tools to daily life
      • Power of Breath work
      • Breathing practices
      • Group practice
    • Servant Leadership impact on Agile teams
      • Review of Team Progression Model
      • Review of Agile Values and Principles
      • Review of Scrum Values
      • Wisdom Nuggets
  • Review of Breathwork
  • Take Home Instructions
  • Next Steps

Rakesh Sadhwani

Business Strategy Advisor

Rakesh Sadhwani is an entrepreneur, businessman, and technical leader who possesses a wealth of industry experience and know-how.  He currently serves as the CEO of an award winning, Bay Area technical staffing and solutions firm, Vertisystem. Rakesh’s expertise includes on-shoring and off-shoring, staff augmentation, business strategy, business development and creating valued partnerships.

What sets Rakesh apart as a leader is his dedication to the relationship first, his genuine commitment to the community, enabling his staff’, and a commitment to doing what is right.  Rakesh is a true partner who sincerely listens and endeavors to deliver value above and beyond your expectations. Rakesh lives with his wife and two daughters in Fremont, California.

Amitabh Sinha

Execution Strategy Advisor, CTC, ICF-PCC, SPC

Amitabh (Amit) Sinha: Your Catalyst for Agile Transformation

Amitabh (Amit) Sinha isn’t just your typical advisor. He’s the  strategic force behind unlocking the full potential of individuals, teams, and organizations. As an entrepreneur, visionary, mentor, trainer, and coach, Amit is a true servant leader, driven by a passion for Agile and its profound impact on people and principles.

Championing People for Success

Amit doesn’t just manage teams; he elevates them. His leadership is rooted in Agile, Scrum, Kanban, and an innate understanding of what motivates individuals. He’s a people champion, dedicated to nurturing the best in teams, helping them discover their path to both effectiveness and happiness.

Transforming Success Stories

Amit’s track record speaks for itself. He’s spearheaded transformative journeys for countless teams, departments, and organizations. His approach has seen teams evolve into high-performing, ecstatic units. Exuberance isn’t just a word – it’s a common descriptor for teams under Amit’s guidance.

Mastering the Agile Mindset

Amit’s influence doesn’t stop at team levels. He empowers Scrum Masters, Product Owners, leaders, and executives to embrace the Agile mindset fully. Through his guidance, they learn the art of crafting effective products that genuinely delight customers.

Sharing Wisdom with the World

Amit’s contributions extend beyond organizational boundaries. He’s a sought-after speaker at prestigious forums and meetups, including the Agile Alliance conferences in Nashville (AA 2022) and Denver’s Global Scrum Gathering (GSG 2022). At these events, he has captivated audiences with his insights and vision for Agile transformation.

Leadership Coach of Choice

Amit holds the International Coach Federation (ICF) Professional Certified Coach (PCC) credential, making him the leadership coach of choice for several senior executives and C-suite professionals. His guidance doesn’t just create success; it fosters excellence.

Amit’s Universe

In the heart of Silicon Valley, Amit resides with his wife and three sons, thriving in an environment that thrives on innovation and possibility.

Amit’s not just a name; it’s a catalyst for Agile transformation. Embrace the change. Engage, partner, and collaborate with the person who can redefine success for you. Amitabh Sinha – your guide to Agile excellence.

Jeff Patton

Chief Troublemaker

Jeff Patton helps companies adopt a way of working that’s focused on building great products, not just building stuff faster. Jeff blends a mixture of Agile thinking, Lean and Lean Startup Thinking, and UX Design and Design Thinking to end up with a holistic product-centric way of working. Jeff is author of the bestselling O’Reilly book User Story Mapping which describes a simple holistic approach to using stories in Agile development without losing sight of the big picture.

Jeff’s a Certified Scrum Trainer, and winner of the Agile Alliance’s 2007 Gordon Pask Award for contributions to Agile Development. You can learn more about Jeff, and find essays and past writing from his columns with StickyMinds.com, Better Software Magazine, and IEEE Software on his website: jpattonassociates.com. 

Michael de la Maza

PhD, MIT, CEC, Co founder Demingway.com

Michael de la Maza is the founder of Heart Healthy Scrum and a Scrum Alliance Certified Enterprise Coach (CEC). Previously, he was VP of Corporate Strategy at Softricity (acquired by Microsoft in 2006) and co-founder of Inquira (acquired by Oracle in 2011). He is the co-editor of Agile Coaching: Wisdom from Practitioners and co-author of Professional Scrum with TFS 2010 and Why Agile Works: The Values Behind The Results. He holds a PhD in Computer Science from MIT.

Alireza Boloorchi

PhD in Computer Science

Alireza Boloorchi is passionate about efficiency for the whole. He believes leadership is about the courage in sacrificing localized efficiency for a greater goal. For the last 12 years, he has been helping several large and small organizations to adopt/adapt more efficient process using Agile/Lean values and principles.

He received his PhD in Computer Science and is Certified Scrum Professional by Scrum Alliance. His experience is rooted in software engineering followed up in roles such as Scrum Master, Agile coach, ENT Agile coach, and leadership in Agile organizations.

He has worked/consulted in several industries such as Finance, Game, Semiconductor, manufacturing , etc. Academia has been an important part of his professional life, and He is researching and teaching Agile in the academia as an Adjunct Professor at Oklahoma State University. And serves as reviewer for several journals such as Journal of Super Computing, Network Systems, and Information Science.

Kate Gonzales

Principal, Agile Coach

 

Kate Brown Gonzales is a distinguished Agile Coach known for her expertise in guiding organizations through transformation and enhancing team performance by applying Agile and Lean approaches. Kate has become a sought-after consultant, speaker, and mentor in the Agile community.

She has worked with a diverse range of organizations, from startups to Fortune 100 companies, helping them adopt Agile frameworks such as Scrum, Kanban, and SAFe (Scaled Agile Framework). She is certified in SPC 6.0 (SAFe Program Consultant), and her training sessions are known for their practical insights and engaging delivery, making complex concepts accessible and actionable.

Elena Vassilieva

Innovation Leader Coach & Agile Transformation Adviser

Elena Vassilieva is an executive leadership coach who uses virtual reality (VR) and artificial intelligence (AI) to facilitate sustainable and immersive feedback for conscious leadership development. Elena integrates principles of Conversational and Emotional IQ and Systemic Team coaching with an Agile/Lean empirical approach to create a personalized holistic coaching
experience. Drawing on her years of training, mentoring, and coaching executives and teams in Agile transformation, she now serves as a trusted advisor for thought leaders who engage in digital transformation.
Elena is an experienced people development leader known for her ability to creatively align business strategy to people’s practices while keeping a passionate focus on workplace culture and values.
Elena is an ICF Certified Coach, ORSC, and AoEC Certified Systemic Team Coach, Certified Visionary Leadership Coach.
As the Scrum Alliance Certified Coach and Certified Agile Leadership Educator, Elena is teaching, training, and coaching teams and individuals to become great Agile professionals and Agile leaders. She brings together diverse and passionate voices dedicated to developing thriving workplace cultures, creating joy and value with the Agile approach, and embracing the agile mindset in work and life environments.
Elena works with leaders and teams around the globe, helping them engage in digital transformation and mapping out powerful organizational shifts to create a sustainable culture focused on learning and innovation. She helps executives in global companies find alignment around cultural and social diversity and aligns around shared purpose, shared values, and business goals.
Elena blends her diverse experiences as a trusted advisor, professional consultant, coach, researcher, and VR documentary producer.

Patrick Foster

Agile Coach


Patrick Foster

I’m a leader who serves as an Agile Coach in organizations.

I help senior leadership plan long-term strategic decisions while embracing the Agile mindset.

I also work with teams to help them become self organizing on their journey of providing value to the customers.

I see my clients as creative, resourceful, and whole and I’m here to walk alongside them to achieve business outcomes.

Eric Rapin

Agile Coach and Trainer

Eric Rapin is the founder and CEO of Lucid Agile, Inc. and a Scrum Alliance Certified Scrum Trainer®, leading efforts to adopt and improve organizations use of Scrum and other Agile methods. He has been working in software product development in various roles for over 30 years. Beginning his career as a software engineer and moving through various product development roles from dev to test to release and performance, Eric has covered the gamut in the software world, half of that time in various management roles. Eric discovered that many things he had started doing were articulated best by the Agile world and found a natural home there. Eric has worked at many leading companies such as Nortel, Apple, Sun Microsystems, Openwave, Adobe, Tableau, and Salesforce.Eric focuses most specifically on Retrospective Facilitation and has been active in the Retrospective Facilitator’s Gathering community for over 10 years.

Scrum Trainer: Eric Rapin
RECOMMENDED BY FORTUNE 100 CUSTOMERS. Taught by a Silicon Valley Technology Executive. Perfect 5-Star Google Rating by Students – “Eric is very knowledgeable in Agile methodology and is a great story teller. He kept the class captivated!”

Virtual CSM (VCSM)- FAQ

Agenda
The Certified Scrum Master Workshop® is divided into 4 Sprints and covers the following topics:

Sprint 1
  • Introduce the Scrum
  • Structure of the Workshop Agile Values and Observable Behaviors
  • Agile Principles and Identifying
  • Challenges Applying Them
Sprint 2
  • Scrum in the Real World
  • Scrum Definition and Values
  • Scrum Roles and Defining Responsibilities
Sprint 3
  • Scrum Artifacts and Events and Designing
  • Effective Ones
  • Introduce the Simulation
Sprint 4
  • Simulation to practice Scrum
  • History of Scrum
Other topics often get covered such as:
  • Estimation and Planning
  • User Stories
  • Definition of Ready
  • Leadership Style Antipatterns of Agile and Scrum Adoption
  • …and topics that emerge during the workshop.
Course
Learn Scrum by using Scrum. This two-day interactive workshop is run using Scrum and you also get to experience Scrum through a fun simulation.

Become a Certified Scrum Master® by attending this well-crafted and engaging workshop taught by a seasoned trainer. This course isn’t just for Scrum Masters and benefits anyone in your organization who needs a solid foundation in Scrum and Agile. It’s also a great refresher if you’ve been practicing Scrum for a while and want to come up-to-date on any improvements to Scrum.

Using the latest tools, the workshop is designed to keep you engaged and provide a high-quality, remote learning experience.

The workshop incorporates Agile and Scrum values, principles, and practices throughout to reinforce the learning. Using real-world examples plus theory, you will receive a thorough grounding in how Scrum works and practical applications to take back to work.

Upon course completion you gain a two-year Scrum Alliance Membership and become eligible for the Certified Scrum Master® exam, required to complete the Scrum Alliance certification process.

To ensure the best possible learning experience, workshop enrollment is limited to 25 students only.
Who should attend
This Certified Scrum Master® Workshop helps everyone in your organization who wants to understand how Scrum and Agile can transform the way you work.

This includes:
  • Leaders at all levels, from C-Suite to 1st line Management
  • Engineers, Analysts, Testers, Design, & Ops
  • Program & Project Managers
  • Marketing, HR, Legal, Support, or any function in your business solving hard problems
  • You?
About the Trainer - Eric Rapin

Eric Rapin, Certified Scrum Trainer® has taught thousands in a wide variety of industries including software product development, where he spent the majority of his career, but also to organizations in banking, finance, insurance, pharma/biotech, hardware storage, non-profits, IT infrastructure teams and many others. Eric has received positive feedback for how he facilitates his remote training, improved from 100+ remote training workshops over 2000+ hours. Eric has played a variety of roles including 15 years in management positions. His experience includes many Fortune 100 companies such as Adobe, Apple, Sun Microsystems with years of managing global software development teams around the world.

Zoom Requirements, Etiquette and Miscellaneous Information

Live-Online Requirements
To participate in the online course, you’ll need the following:

  • A quiet, comfortable place to be for the duration of the class
    • Choose an area without distractions
    • Be mindful of managing potential interruptions (e.g. children, pets, etc).
  • Computer (desktop, laptop, or tablet)
  • Camera and microphone (we’ll have virtual breakout rooms)
  • Headset to filter out room noise
  • Internet connectivity
  • Ability to download the workbook

Attendance
We ask that you participate like you would if you were in class.

  • Punctual arrival
  • Full attention and participation (video is required)
  • Committed to full, 100% attendance and participation during class time
  • Attendees must participate in both two days of class.
    Instructors are unable to certify students who miss more than one hour of class. If you anticipate that you may miss more than one hour, please contact your instructor in advance to discuss your situation and determine if rescheduling the class is the best option.

Engagement

  • Breaks – The course will include frequent breaks to allow time away from the screen, time to stretch your legs, and check on friends/family.
  • Video Required – You’ll be working with others in video breakout rooms. It’s a unique way to engage with your classmates and dive deeper into discussions.
  • Tools – Our coaches have incorporated easy-to-use websites and online collaboration tools to support their lessons.

PDU and SEU Credits
This course provides 16 SEUs of the 70 needed for the Certified Scrum Professional (CSP) certification. This course also earns 16 PMI PDUs and 16 needed for the PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP) certification and PMP certification.


Frequently asked Questions

  • Where can I contact the organizer with any questions about the course?
    Please email all questions by contacting Support here
  • Is my registration/ticket transferrable?
    Yes. Attendees are allowed one transfer, but it must be to the same class type and can only be transferred for the next upcoming class.
  • Do you offer group discounts?
    Yes! We are happy to accommodate large groups and encourage full teams to sign up. Contact us information@agilonomics.com for more information on discount pricing.

Scrum Trainer: Eric Rapin
RECOMMENDED BY FORTUNE 100 CUSTOMERS. Taught by a Silicon Valley Technology Executive. Perfect 5-Star Google Rating by Students – “Eric is very knowledgeable in Agile methodology and is a great story teller. He kept the class captivated!”

Virtual CSPO (VCSPO) - FAQ

Agenda
The Certified Scrum Product Owner Workshop® is divided into 4 Sprints and covers the following topics:

Sprint 1
  • The Product Owner Role
  • Product Vision
Sprint 2
  • Testing Your Vision
  • Bias and Decision Making
Sprint 3
  • Validated Learning
  • Customer Development/Lean Startup
  • Designing Experiments
Sprint 4
  • Roadmapping using Innovation Games
  • User Stories and Customer empathy
  • User Story Mapping
Other topics often get covered such as:
  • Brief review of Scrum and recent changes
  • Estimation and Planning
  • Definition of Ready/Definition of Done
  • Leadership Style
  • Antipatterns of Agile and Scrum Adoption
  • …and topics that emerge during the workshop.
Course
Learn Scrum by using Scrum. This two-day interactive workshop is run using Scrum. This certification masters the product view of Agile. Create a product vision, build a roadmap, discover your biases, test your assumptions, validate your choices, and deliver exceptional results for your customers

Become a Certified Scrum Product Owner® by attending this well-crafted and engaging workshop taught by a seasoned trainer. This course isn’t just for Product Owners and benefits anyone in your organization who regularly works with a Product Owner, helps refine the Product Backlog, or is generally involved with helping define what the right thing for their customer needs to be.

Using the latest tools, the workshop is designed to keep you engaged and provide a high-quality, remote learning experience.

The workshop incorporates Agile and Scrum values, principles, and practices throughout to reinforce the learning. Using real-world examples plus theory, you will leave with practical tools to help you improve your Product Ownership game.

Upon course completion you gain a two-year Scrum Alliance Membership and become a Certified Scrum Product Owner®.

To ensure the best possible learning experience, workshop enrollment is limited to 25 students only.
Who should attend

This Certified Scrum Product Owner® Workshop by the Scrum Alliance is beneficial for product leaders, strategists, designers, business analysts, and team leads who work on creating product strategy, create requirements, or are responsible for helping prioritize a team’s (teams?) work.  Whether products are targeted for consumers, businesses, internal users, this course will enable more effective product practices.

 

This includes:

  • Product Management
  • Business Analysis
  • Design and User Experience
  • Marketing
  • Executives and Management
  • Technology Leadership
  • Architecture
  • Program and Project Management
  • You?
About the Trainer - Eric Rapin

Eric Rapin, Certified Scrum Trainer® has taught thousands in a wide variety of industries including software product development, where he spent the majority of his career, but also to organizations in banking, finance, insurance, pharma/biotech, hardware storage, non-profits, IT infrastructure teams and many others. Eric has received positive feedback for how he facilitates his remote training, improved from 100+ remote training workshops over 2000+ hours. Eric has played a variety of roles including 15 years in management positions. His experience includes many Fortune 100 companies such as Adobe, Apple, Sun Microsystems with years of managing global software development teams around the world.

Zoom Requirements, Etiquette and Miscellaneous Information

Live-Online Requirements
To participate in the online course, you’ll need the following:

  • A quiet, comfortable place to be for the duration of the class
    • Choose an area without distractions
    • Be mindful of managing potential interruptions (e.g. children, pets, etc).
  • Computer (desktop, laptop, or tablet)
  • Camera and microphone (we’ll have virtual breakout rooms)
  • Headset to filter out room noise
  • Internet connectivity
  • Ability to download the workbook

Attendance
We ask that you participate like you would if you were in class.

  • Punctual arrival
  • Full attention and participation (video is required)
  • Committed to full, 100% attendance and participation during class time
  • Attendees must participate in both two days of class.
    Instructors are unable to certify students who miss more than one hour of class. If you anticipate that you may miss more than one hour, please contact your instructor in advance to discuss your situation and determine if rescheduling the class is the best option.

Engagement

  • Breaks – The course will include frequent breaks to allow time away from the screen, time to stretch your legs, and check on friends/family.
  • Video Required – You’ll be working with others in video breakout rooms. It’s a unique way to engage with your classmates and dive deeper into discussions.
  • Tools – Our coaches have incorporated easy-to-use websites and online collaboration tools to support their lessons.

PDU and SEU Credits
This course provides 16 SEUs of the 70 needed for the Certified Scrum Professional (CSP) certification. This course also earns 16 PMI PDUs and 16 needed for the PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP) certification and PMP certification.

Frequently asked Questions

  • Where can I contact the organizer with any questions about the course?
    Please email all questions by contacting Support here
  • Is my registration/ticket transferrable?
    Yes. Attendees are allowed one transfer, but it must be to the same class type and can only be transferred for the next upcoming class.
  • Do you offer group discounts?
    Yes! We are happy to accommodate large groups and encourage full teams to sign up. Contact us information@agilonomics.com for more information on discount pricing.
Aldriff Cruz

Aldriff Cruz

Web Developer

A results-driven Web Developer with 10+ years of experience in web development. A proven track record of architecting, developing, and implementing interactive websites. Adept at leveraging SEO strategies and user-centered design principles to engage users and grow web traffic.

Scrum Trainer: Amitabh Sinha
November 15-16, 2023
2PM – 4PM PST

"Scrum Mastery" Webinar - FAQ

Agenda

Welcome & Introduction

  • Icebreaker activity
  • Setting expectations & objectives

Understanding the Scrum Master Role

  • Experience a day and sprint in a Scrum Master’s life
  • Explore responsibilities and key stakeholder interactions

Foundations of Scrum

  • Dive into Agile values and principles
  • Understand the Scrum framework, ceremonies, and effective facilitation

Elevating Your Scrum Skills

  • Learn about team development stages
  • Discover online and in-person engagement tools
  • Introduction to DevOps within Agile

Metrics for Success

  • Select and understand key team metrics
  • Techniques to measure and ensure team happiness

Open Forum

  • Discuss common challenges and brainstorm solutions

Becoming an Exceptional Scrum Master

  • Discover the difference between average and great Scrum Masters
  • Dive into the ABCs of Conscious Leadership

Path Forward

  • Plan your growth journey as a Scrum Master
  • Emphasis on continued learning and intermediate workshops

Wrap-Up & Feedback

  • Reflect on insights from the session
  • Discuss actionable takeaways and plan next steps
Learning Objectives
  • Recall the fundamental principles of Agile and Scrum.
  • Describe the key responsibilities and stakeholder interactions of a Scrum Master.
  • Distinguish between the characteristics of average and exceptional Scrum Masters.
  • Apply strategies to handle day-to-day challenges in Scrum Master roles.
  • Analyze team metrics to measure and ensure team happiness and productivity.
  • Demonstrate effective facilitation of Scrum ceremonies.
  • Evaluate the utility of online and in-person engagement tools in fostering team collaboration.
  • Integrate the principles of Conscious Leadership (Awareness, Belongingness, Charisma) in daily leadership activities.
  • Formulate a roadmap for continuous growth and learning in the Scrum Master journey.
Who should attend
  • Aspiring Scrum Masters: Individuals looking to transition into the role and understand its depth and breadth.
  • Current Scrum Masters: Professionals seeking to elevate their skills, knowledge, and effectiveness in their current role.
  • Agile Team Members: Developers, product owners, and other roles within Agile teams who wish to understand the Scrum Master’s function better.
  • Project Managers: Traditional project managers considering a move to Agile frameworks or wanting to synergize with Scrum teams.
  • Organizational Leaders: Decision-makers aiming to champion Agile transformations within their organizations.
  • HR & Talent Development Professionals: Those tasked with training and upskilling Scrum teams or understanding what makes an effective Scrum Master.
  • Agile Coaches & Consultants: Professionals guiding organizations in Agile transitions who want a refreshed perspective on the Scrum Master’s evolving role.
  • Stakeholders: Any individual regularly interacting with Scrum teams and wanting to better align their communications and expectations.
About the Trainer - Amitabh Sinha

Amitabh (Amit) Sinha: Mastering the Art of Agile Leadership


In the dynamic realm of Agile transformation, few shine as brightly as Amitabh (Amit) Sinha. With years of hands-on experience, Amit isn’t just a Scrum Master Coach and Trainer; he’s a beacon for teams striving for excellence. His distinctive approach seamlessly blends theory with actionable insights, making even the most intricate Scrum principles accessible to all.


From startups grappling with rapid growth to established enterprises aiming for greater agility, Amit’s guidance has consistently proven invaluable. As a mentor, he’s elevated the capabilities of countless Scrum Masters, fostering an environment of continuous learning and improvement. His webinars aren’t just sessions; they’re immersive experiences that leave attendees empowered, enlightened, and eager to enact change.


Join Amitabh (Amit) Sinha and embark on a transformative journey. Whether you’re new to Scrum or looking to deepen your knowledge, under his tutelage, you’ll discover not just the how, but the why of effective Agile practices. Dive deep into the world of Scrum, demystify its intricacies, and emerge as a more potent, proactive professional.

Zoom Requirements, Etiquette and Miscellaneous Information

Live-Online Requirements
To participate in the online course, you’ll need the following:

  • A quiet, comfortable place to be for the duration of the class
    • Choose an area without distractions
    • Be mindful of managing potential interruptions (e.g. children, pets, etc).
  • Computer (desktop, laptop, or tablet)
  • Camera and microphone (we’ll have virtual breakout rooms)
  • Headset to filter out room noise
  • Internet connectivity
  • Ability to download the workbook

Attendance
We ask that you participate like you would if you were in class.

  • Punctual arrival
  • Full attention and participation (video is required)
  • Committed to full, 100% attendance and participation during class time
  • Attendees must participate in both two days of class.

 

Video Required – You’ll be working with others in video breakout rooms. It’s a unique way to engage with your classmates and dive deeper into discussions.

 

Tools – Our coaches have incorporated easy-to-use websites and online collaboration tools to support their lessons.

Scrum Trainer: Amitabh Sinha
December 13-14, 2023
2PM – 4PM PST

"Scrum Mastery" Webinar - FAQ

Agenda

Welcome & Introduction

  • Icebreaker activity
  • Setting expectations & objectives

Understanding the Scrum Master Role

  • Experience a day and sprint in a Scrum Master’s life
  • Explore responsibilities and key stakeholder interactions

Foundations of Scrum

  • Dive into Agile values and principles
  • Understand the Scrum framework, ceremonies, and effective facilitation

Elevating Your Scrum Skills

  • Learn about team development stages
  • Discover online and in-person engagement tools
  • Introduction to DevOps within Agile

Metrics for Success

  • Select and understand key team metrics
  • Techniques to measure and ensure team happiness

Open Forum

  • Discuss common challenges and brainstorm solutions

Becoming an Exceptional Scrum Master

  • Discover the difference between average and great Scrum Masters
  • Dive into the ABCs of Conscious Leadership

Path Forward

  • Plan your growth journey as a Scrum Master
  • Emphasis on continued learning and intermediate workshops

Wrap-Up & Feedback

  • Reflect on insights from the session
  • Discuss actionable takeaways and plan next steps
Learning Objectives
  • Recall the fundamental principles of Agile and Scrum.
  • Describe the key responsibilities and stakeholder interactions of a Scrum Master.
  • Distinguish between the characteristics of average and exceptional Scrum Masters.
  • Apply strategies to handle day-to-day challenges in Scrum Master roles.
  • Analyze team metrics to measure and ensure team happiness and productivity.
  • Demonstrate effective facilitation of Scrum ceremonies.
  • Evaluate the utility of online and in-person engagement tools in fostering team collaboration.
  • Integrate the principles of Conscious Leadership (Awareness, Belongingness, Charisma) in daily leadership activities.
  • Formulate a roadmap for continuous growth and learning in the Scrum Master journey.
Who should attend
  • Aspiring Scrum Masters: Individuals looking to transition into the role and understand its depth and breadth.
  • Current Scrum Masters: Professionals seeking to elevate their skills, knowledge, and effectiveness in their current role.
  • Agile Team Members: Developers, product owners, and other roles within Agile teams who wish to understand the Scrum Master’s function better.
  • Project Managers: Traditional project managers considering a move to Agile frameworks or wanting to synergize with Scrum teams.
  • Organizational Leaders: Decision-makers aiming to champion Agile transformations within their organizations.
  • HR & Talent Development Professionals: Those tasked with training and upskilling Scrum teams or understanding what makes an effective Scrum Master.
  • Agile Coaches & Consultants: Professionals guiding organizations in Agile transitions who want a refreshed perspective on the Scrum Master’s evolving role.
  • Stakeholders: Any individual regularly interacting with Scrum teams and wanting to better align their communications and expectations.
About the Trainer - Amitabh Sinha

Amitabh (Amit) Sinha: Mastering the Art of Agile Leadership


In the dynamic realm of Agile transformation, few shine as brightly as Amitabh (Amit) Sinha. With years of hands-on experience, Amit isn’t just a Scrum Master Coach and Trainer; he’s a beacon for teams striving for excellence. His distinctive approach seamlessly blends theory with actionable insights, making even the most intricate Scrum principles accessible to all.


From startups grappling with rapid growth to established enterprises aiming for greater agility, Amit’s guidance has consistently proven invaluable. As a mentor, he’s elevated the capabilities of countless Scrum Masters, fostering an environment of continuous learning and improvement. His webinars aren’t just sessions; they’re immersive experiences that leave attendees empowered, enlightened, and eager to enact change.


Join Amitabh (Amit) Sinha and embark on a transformative journey. Whether you’re new to Scrum or looking to deepen your knowledge, under his tutelage, you’ll discover not just the how, but the why of effective Agile practices. Dive deep into the world of Scrum, demystify its intricacies, and emerge as a more potent, proactive professional.

Zoom Requirements, Etiquette and Miscellaneous Information

Live-Online Requirements
To participate in the online course, you’ll need the following:

  • A quiet, comfortable place to be for the duration of the class
    • Choose an area without distractions
    • Be mindful of managing potential interruptions (e.g. children, pets, etc).
  • Computer (desktop, laptop, or tablet)
  • Camera and microphone (we’ll have virtual breakout rooms)
  • Headset to filter out room noise
  • Internet connectivity
  • Ability to download the workbook

Attendance
We ask that you participate like you would if you were in class.

  • Punctual arrival
  • Full attention and participation (video is required)
  • Committed to full, 100% attendance and participation during class time
  • Attendees must participate in both two days of class.

 

Video Required – You’ll be working with others in video breakout rooms. It’s a unique way to engage with your classmates and dive deeper into discussions.

 

Tools – Our coaches have incorporated easy-to-use websites and online collaboration tools to support their lessons.

Scrum Trainer: Amitabh Sinha
December 6 – 7, 2023
2PM – 4PM PST

"Product Ownership" Webinar - FAQ

Agenda

Introduction & Welcome

  • Unveiling the journey: How Amit embarked on the Agile path.
  • The role of the Product Owner: Not just a title, but a commitment to excellence.

Unpacking the Ideal Product Owner

  • Traits and qualities that differentiate good from great.

Deep Dive: Roles & Responsibilities

  • A comprehensive look at the multifaceted duties of a Product Owner.

A Glimpse into the Life of a Product Owner

  • Daily routines, sprint activities, and the challenges they face.

Essential Skills Mastery

  • Key skills every Product Owner needs and how to cultivate them.

Must-Have Tools & Frameworks

  • From story mapping to backlog management: The tools that drive success.

Case Studies: Lessons from the Field

  • Real-world examples of Product Owner success stories.

Interactive Exercises

  • Hands-on activities to embed learning and drive home key concepts.

Q&A Session

  • Your chance to ask Amit about his experiences, challenges, and best practices.
Learning Objectives
  • Define the core roles and responsibilities of a Product Owner within an Agile team.
  • Describe the essential traits that distinguish an effective Product Owner.
  • Apply prioritization techniques to effectively organize a product backlog.
  • Analyze real-world case studies to identify best practices and improvement areas for Product Owners.
  • Construct a compelling vision statement for a hypothetical product.
  • Evaluate various tools and frameworks to choose the most suitable for specific Product Owner scenarios.
  • Design a basic user story map for a given product idea, integrating feedback and insights from the session.
Who should attend
  • Aspiring Product Owners: Individuals keen on transitioning to a Product Owner role and looking for foundational knowledge.
  • Current Product Owners: Those aiming to deepen their understanding, enhance their skills, and stay updated with best practices.
  • Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches: Professionals working closely with Product Owners who wish to gain deeper insights into the PO role to better support their teams.
  • Product Managers: Those seeking to understand the nuances between their role and the role of a Product Owner, especially in organizations adopting Agile methodologies.
  • Business Analysts: Professionals looking to broaden their skillset and understanding of product development within Agile frameworks.
  • Development Team Members: Developers, designers, testers, and other team members who collaborate with Product Owners and want a better understanding of their role and expectations.
  • Stakeholders & Business Leaders: Decision-makers who interact with Product Owners and need a clear understanding of the role to align business strategies and product development.
  • Agile Trainers and Consultants: Those who provide training or consultation services in Agile settings and want to comprehensively understand the Product Owner’s role to better guide their clients.
About the Trainer - Amitabh Sinha

Amitabh Sinha, fondly known as Amit, isn’t just a name in the realm of Agile coaching; he’s an institution. With decades under his belt as a Product Owner Coach and Trainer, Amit has empowered countless professionals to harness the true potential of their roles and drive exceptional outcomes for their organizations.


His journey, rooted in hands-on experience, has seen him wear multiple hats – from an influential Product Owner navigating complex product landscapes to a transformational coach sculpting the next generation of Agile champions. Amit’s unique blend of deep functional knowledge, real-world anecdotes, and magnetic teaching style makes his sessions an immersive experience.


Amit’s credentials go beyond the traditional. While he’s equipped with a slew of certifications and accolades, it’s his results-driven approach, unwavering commitment to continuous learning, and genuine passion for elevating every Product Owner he mentors that truly set him apart.
By choosing to learn from Amit, you’re not just attending another workshop. You’re embarking on a transformative journey, guided by one of the industry’s brightest luminaries.

Zoom Requirements, Etiquette and Miscellaneous Information

Live-Online Requirements
To participate in the online course, you’ll need the following:

  • A quiet, comfortable place to be for the duration of the class
    • Choose an area without distractions
    • Be mindful of managing potential interruptions (e.g. children, pets, etc).
  • Computer (desktop, laptop, or tablet)
  • Camera and microphone (we’ll have virtual breakout rooms)
  • Headset to filter out room noise
  • Internet connectivity
  • Ability to download the workbook

Attendance
We ask that you participate like you would if you were in class.

  • Punctual arrival
  • Full attention and participation (video is required)
  • Committed to full, 100% attendance and participation during class time
  • Attendees must participate in both two days of class.

 

Video Required – You’ll be working with others in video breakout rooms. It’s a unique way to engage with your classmates and dive deeper into discussions.

 

Tools – Our coaches have incorporated easy-to-use websites and online collaboration tools to support their lessons.

Scrum Trainer: Amitabh Sinha
November 7 – 9, 2023
4PM – 7PM PST

"The ABC Conscious Leadership Workshop" - FAQ

Agenda
  • Introduction to
  • Conscious Leadership
  • Mindfulness Practices
  • Leader Mindset People &
  • Connection Growth
  • Mindset & Action Plan
Learning Objectives
  • Explore ABC Conscious Leadership Principles for Excellence.
  • Apply Mindfulness for Self-Aware, Relatable Leadership.
  • Develop Charismatic Leadership Presence.
  • Create ABC-Infused Leadership Strategies.
  • Evaluate Conscious Leadership Impact on Teams.
Who should attend
  • CEOs and CxOs
  • Executives and Senior Leaders
  • Managers and Supervisors
  • Aspiring Scrum Masters
  • Emerging Leaders
  • Visionary Entrepreneurs
  • Professionals at All Levels
  • Anyone Who Aims to Evolve into an All-Round, Powerful Conscious Leader
About the Trainer - Amitabh Sinha

Prepare to be guided on your transformational journey by Amitabh Sinha (Amit), a visionary leader and seasoned mentor in the realm of conscious leadership. With a wealth of experience, Amit has inspired and empowered countless individuals and organizations to unlock their true potential.

 

As a dynamic force in the world of leadership development, Amit brings a unique blend of wisdom, charisma, and mindfulness expertise to the table. His passion for fostering awareness, belongingness, and charisma (ABC) in leaders has ignited positive change on a global scale. Join Amit in this transformative workshop and embark on a journey toward becoming a powerful, conscious leader who makes a profound impact on your team, your organization, and the world.

Why Should You Take This Workshop?

In a world where leadership is more than just a title, where success is measured by the positive impact you make, and where conscious choices drive meaningful change, this workshop is your gateway to transformation.

 

Imagine leading with an unwavering sense of Awareness, a deep connection of Belongingness, and an irresistible Charisma that draws others toward your vision. Envision a leadership journey where mindfulness becomes your superpower, where selflessness is your strength, and where servant leadership is not just a concept but your way of life.

 

This workshop is your opportunity to not only grow as a leader but to thrive as an all-rounded, conscious leader who leaves an indelible mark on the world. Join us and discover the extraordinary leader within you. Your journey to greatness begins here.

Zoom Requirements, Etiquette and Miscellaneous Information

Live-Online Requirements
To participate in the online course, you’ll need the following:

  • A quiet, comfortable place to be for the duration of the class
    • Choose an area without distractions
    • Be mindful of managing potential interruptions (e.g. children, pets, etc).
  • Computer (desktop, laptop, or tablet)
  • Camera and microphone (we’ll have virtual breakout rooms)
  • Headset to filter out room noise
  • Internet connectivity
  • Ability to download the workbook

Attendance
We ask that you participate like you would if you were in class.

  • Punctual arrival
  • Full attention and participation (video is required)
  • Committed to full, 100% attendance and participation during class time
  • Attendees must participate in both two days of class.

Video Required – You’ll be working with others in video breakout rooms. It’s a unique way to engage with your classmates and dive deeper into discussions.

Tools – Our coaches have incorporated easy-to-use websites and online collaboration tools to support their lessons.

Scrum Trainer: Amitabh Sinha
December 19 – 21, 2023
4PM – 7PM PST

"The ABC Conscious Leadership Workshop" - FAQ

Agenda
  • Introduction to
  • Conscious Leadership
  • Mindfulness Practices
  • Leader Mindset People &
  • Connection Growth
  • Mindset & Action Plan
Learning Objectives
  • Explore ABC Conscious Leadership Principles for Excellence.
  • Apply Mindfulness for Self-Aware, Relatable Leadership.
  • Develop Charismatic Leadership Presence.
  • Create ABC-Infused Leadership Strategies.
  • Evaluate Conscious Leadership Impact on Teams.
Who should attend
  • CEOs and CxOs
  • Executives and Senior Leaders
  • Managers and Supervisors
  • Aspiring Scrum Masters
  • Emerging Leaders
  • Visionary Entrepreneurs
  • Professionals at All Levels
  • Anyone Who Aims to Evolve into an All-Round, Powerful Conscious Leader
About the Trainer - Amitabh Sinha

Prepare to be guided on your transformational journey by Amitabh Sinha (Amit), a visionary leader and seasoned mentor in the realm of conscious leadership. With a wealth of experience, Amit has inspired and empowered countless individuals and organizations to unlock their true potential.

 

As a dynamic force in the world of leadership development, Amit brings a unique blend of wisdom, charisma, and mindfulness expertise to the table. His passion for fostering awareness, belongingness, and charisma (ABC) in leaders has ignited positive change on a global scale. Join Amit in this transformative workshop and embark on a journey toward becoming a powerful, conscious leader who makes a profound impact on your team, your organization, and the world.

Why Should You Take This Workshop?

In a world where leadership is more than just a title, where success is measured by the positive impact you make, and where conscious choices drive meaningful change, this workshop is your gateway to transformation.

 

Imagine leading with an unwavering sense of Awareness, a deep connection of Belongingness, and an irresistible Charisma that draws others toward your vision. Envision a leadership journey where mindfulness becomes your superpower, where selflessness is your strength, and where servant leadership is not just a concept but your way of life.

 

This workshop is your opportunity to not only grow as a leader but to thrive as an all-rounded, conscious leader who leaves an indelible mark on the world. Join us and discover the extraordinary leader within you. Your journey to greatness begins here.

Zoom Requirements, Etiquette and Miscellaneous Information

Live-Online Requirements
To participate in the online course, you’ll need the following:

  • A quiet, comfortable place to be for the duration of the class
    • Choose an area without distractions
    • Be mindful of managing potential interruptions (e.g. children, pets, etc).
  • Computer (desktop, laptop, or tablet)
  • Camera and microphone (we’ll have virtual breakout rooms)
  • Headset to filter out room noise
  • Internet connectivity
  • Ability to download the workbook

Attendance
We ask that you participate like you would if you were in class.

  • Punctual arrival
  • Full attention and participation (video is required)
  • Committed to full, 100% attendance and participation during class time
  • Attendees must participate in both two days of class.

Video Required – You’ll be working with others in video breakout rooms. It’s a unique way to engage with your classmates and dive deeper into discussions.

Tools – Our coaches have incorporated easy-to-use websites and online collaboration tools to support their lessons.

Hernan Tocuyo

Advisor / Collaborator
Global Consulting Group US

 

MBA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT Business School) Generating Business Value; PMP, SAFe SPC6 / LPM6 & RTE6


Hernan is seasoned Agile Coach, Trainer, and Transformation Leader with extensive experience in Fortune 2000 organizations. Hernan possesses strong leadership skills that facilitate effective change management, transformation, and process improvement. He is recognized for executing and implementing innovative strategies, successfully leading global IT operations in supply chain, distribution, operations, and logistics. With hands-on experience in transitioning organizations from a transactional mindset to an agile one, Hernan also brings consulting expertise across various industries including manufacturing, retail, insurance, telecommunications, media, financial services, energy management & automation, non-profit, franchise networks, and hospitality. Hernan has been teaching SAFe classes private and public since 2018.

Expertise:

  • DevOps & program Agile Coach & Trainer

  • Business Agility / Innovation & Transformation

  • Value Stream Mapping

  • Vendor Packages Implementation / Integration

  • Customer Centricity / Design Thinking

  • IT & Business Strategy Development & Implementation

  • Supply Chain Management

  • Cloud & Digitization Evaluation & Implementation

  • Sales / Marketing / Hospitality / Financial & HR Applications

  • Financial Management

Time: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm PST
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm PST

Duration: 1 day workshop
Cost: $475/person

SCRUM MASTER WORKSHOP

On request this could also be split over 2 days

Learning Outcomes

  1. Who is a Scrum Master?
  2. A day in the life of a Scrum Master
  3. A Sprint in the life of a Scrum Master
  4. Scrum Master Role and Responsibilities
    1. Scrum Master serving The Team (Developers)
    2. Scrum Master serving Product Owner
    3. Scrum Master serving Stakeholders
  5. Scrum Master as a Servant Leader change agent
    1. How to coach your Scrum Team?
    2. How to coach the larger organization?
    3. How to challenge the status quo?
  6. Agile basics – review
    1. Agile Values and Principles
  7. Scrum framework overview – review
    1. Scrum Values
    2. Scrum ceremonies – review
      1. Facilitation in Scrum events
  8. Tools 
    1. Understanding team development stages
    2. How to create engagement using online and in person tools?
    3. Understanding DevOps
  9. Metrics
    1. How to choose the best metrics for your team?
    2. Understanding Team Happiness
  10. Open topics
    1. Challenges faced in day to day work
      1. Brainstorm solutions 
  11. What makes a great Scrum Master? 
  12. How to grow as a Scrum Master
  13. Next steps